Peer Project Update - January 2016


In January 2016, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools released The Peer Project Update to highlight investments that have been made to-date by the Foundation to support the Peer Project initiative. Following are some of the professional development opportunities funded between June 2015 and January 2016:
 
Commonweal Grant
The Commonweal model of informed civic action will be implemented in social studies classrooms in grades 1 through 12. Teachers will learn to develop units to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Commonweal is a series of community lab experiments designed to increase civic engagement and academic achievement. Commonweal brings learning to life for students who explore their schools and neighborhoods to create solutions to community challenges. The Peer Project is investing $8,500 to provide teachers with professional development to design units.
 
Collaborative Learning Conference Book: Beyond Measure
As part of addressing the school district’s goals through the 2015 Collaborative Learning Conference, the district encouraged educators to reflect on how adult behaviors impact student outcomes. Specifically, the district hopes to provide educators with more tools to improve student achievement. Each conference participant received the text Beyond Measure by Margaret Heffernan. Educators are invited to participate in book discussions to discuss how ideas from the book have impacted their work or behavior. The Peer Project investment for the book purchase was $19,000.
 
Poverty Simulation
Principals and department heads worked with Crisis Control Ministries in December to experience the Community Action Poverty Simulation. This learning tool is designed to help people understand the realities of poverty. During the simulation, participants role-played the lives of low-income families. They had the stressful task of providing for basic necessities on a limited budget during the course of four 15-minute “weeks.” They interacted with human service agencies, grocers, pawnbrokers, bill collectors, job interviewers, police officers and others. Reflections from the participants included a better understanding of life in poverty and ideas for ways to better support students and families. The Peer Project contributed $1,500 to provide the experience.  More

CLC Grants
Grants of up to $500 were available for classroom teachers, guidance counselors, teacher assistants, media coordinators, primary reading teachers, reading interventionists, curriculum coordinators, technology facilitators, principals, assistant principals, psychologists, social workers, and home school coordinators to participate in professional learning opportunities. Educators who attended the 2015 Collaborative Learning Conference were eligible to apply for funding. The grants were designed to help educators expand on the conference goals as well as experiences aligned with the district’s goals and priorities. The Peer Project invested $20,000 in educator grant awards.



Commonweal Grant
The Commonweal model of informed civic action will be implemented in social
studies classrooms in grades 1 through 12. Teachers will learn to develop
units to engage students in inquiry-based learning. Commonweal is a series
of community lab experiments designed to increase civic engagement and
academic achievement. Commonweal brings learning to life for students who
explore their schools and neighborhoods to create solutions to community
challenges. The Peer Project is investing $8,500 to provide teachers with professional
development to design units.
CLC Book: Beyond Measure
As part of addressing the school district’s goals through the 2015 Collaborative
Learning Conference, the district encouraged educators to reflect on
how adult behaviors impact student outcomes. Specifically, the district hopes
to provide educators with more tools to improve student achievement. Each
CLC participant received the text Beyond Measure by Margaret Heffernan.
Educators are invited to participate in book discussions to discuss how ideas
from the book have impacted their work or behavior. The next book discussions
will occur on Feb. 15 and April 11; both discussions will start at 5 p.m.
in the WS/FCS Education Building. The Peer Project investment for the book
purchase was $19,000.
Poverty Simulation
Principals and department heads worked with Crisis Control Ministries in
December to experience the Community Action Poverty Simulation. This
learning tool is designed to help people understand the realities of poverty.
During the simulation, participants role-played the lives of low-income families.
They had the stressful task of providing for basic necessities on a limited
budget during the course of four 15-minute “weeks.” They interacted with 
human service agencies, grocers, pawnbrokers, bill collectors, job interviewers, police officers and others. Reflections
from the participants included a better understanding of life in poverty and ideas for ways to better support students
and families. The Peer Project contributed $1,500 to provide the experience.
 
 
 


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